Strawberry Mousse in Honey Tuiles


I'm a big fan of mousses. I feel like a good mousse can fit any occasion - a fancy dinner party, picnic lunch, or just a regular Tuesday night. A mousse can be almost any flavour you can think of, perfect for any and every season. And the texture of a light, smooth, and airy mousse can't be beat.


Another big plus to making mousses - very little cooking involved! That means you don't have to be sweating over a stove when it's already 30 degrees in your kitchen. Another plus - it's the perfect make-ahead dessert. Just whip it up (literally), chill it, and you're done! Pull it out of the fridge and serve it. Super simple.


This mousse has more strawberry puree than whipped cream, so the strawberry flavour really shines. If you can, try to get local strawberries, ones that are red all the way through and super flavourful. I didn't have those when I made these and they still tasted great, but they'd be even better with the tasty little strawberries that are packed with flavour.


If you have to use the white-on-the-inside strawberries, be sure to hull them (take out the white part) to be sure that you get all the good strawberry flavour and none of that watery sour flavour. 

If you don't have any strawberries on hand, this mousse will work with any other kind of berry as well. Same method and everything! Blackberry mousse, raspberry mousse, or even a layered combo of mousses! The Charred Lemon Mousse topped with this strawberry (or blackberry/raspberry) mousse would be unreal! The possibilities with mousse are endless. 



Strawberry Mousse in Honey Tuiles
Recipe adapted from so good.. Magazine, Issue #4

Honey Tuiles

50 g egg whites
50 g icing sugar
50 g unsalted butter, melted
50 g honey
50 g all-purpose flour


Strawberry Mousse

300 g strawberries, hulled and quartered
20 g vanilla sugar
50 g water

250 g strawberry puree
50 g sugar
2 gelatin sheets
190 g heavy cream


First, make the honey tuiles. Combine the egg whites and icing sugar in a small bowl. Slowly add the melted butter, then the honey. Add the flour and stir until smooth. Transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate for at least one hour.

Make the strawberry puree. Combine the strawberries, vanilla sugar, and water in a saucepan over medium heat. Simmer for 3 to 4 minutes, until the strawberries are tender. Remove from heat. Let it cool slightly before pureeing it with a blender or immersion blender. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve to remove the seeds.

Measure out 250 g of the strawberry puree (you should have about 30 to 40 grams extra) into a saucepan. Add the sugar to the puree and set over medium-low heat. 

Meanwhile, soften the gelatin sheets in ice water.

When the sugar in the puree has dissolved, remove from heat and add the gelatin. Stir to make sure it has dissolved. Transfer to a bowl set over an ice bath to cool.

Whip the heavy cream to soft peaks.

Whisk one-third of the whipped cream into the cooled puree, then gently fold in another one-third, then the remaining one-third. 

Fit a piping bag with a round tip. Twist the tip and press the twisted portion of the piping bag inside of the tip, ensuring the mousse will not leak out. Transfer the mousse to the piping bag and place it in a container that will keep the piping bag upright. Use a clip to seal the open end of the piping bag. Chill the mousse until firm, at least 1 hour. 

The tuiles will go soft quickly, so make them only when you are close to serving the desserts.

Preheat the oven to 325 F.

Using a rectangular stencil, wipe the batter onto a silpat. Only make three to four at a times. Transfer the silpat to the baking sheet. Bake the tuiles for 9 to 10 minutes, until they are golden brown.

Using an offset spatula, gently lift the tuiles off the silpat and wrap around a tube (or bottle, cup, etc.), making sure the ends of the tuile overlap. If you need to adjust the tuiles after they have cooled, simply place them back in the oven for 20 seconds and they will become soft and pliable again.

Repeat with the remaining batter.

When you are ready to assemble, place the tuile tubes on the plate you are serving them on. Gently pipe in the strawberry mousse. Garnish with the strawberry puree and a few thin slices of strawberry.

Serve immediately.


25 comments:

  1. Absolutely stunning. Definitely got to make these very soon, though I doubt my tuile making skills!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Haha, don't worry, it's all about practice. Just be prepared to burn your fingers - it's an inevitability with making tuiles!

      Delete
  2. So pretty! What a great idea for a light but impressive dessert!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! That's exactly why I love making mousse - easy, delicious, not too heavy, flavourful, and crowd-pleasing! Who doesn't love mousse?!

      Delete
  3. Yet another masterpiece Megan! Beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey you! Thanks! Hows everything goes with bread production? You ever get around to trying the Tartine Country loaf? What's the weekly bread count nowadays - I'm guessing double what it was when we last talked!

      Delete
  4. Hi Megan,

    It's nice to hear from you! Well, I'm still sort of stuck on 400 loaves a week at the moment as I can only make so much in my 2 deck oven. But.. I've just ordered a new 3 deck one, with 3 trays per deck, which will allow me to increase production - assuming I can find some new customers! And I'm going on a 4 day bread course in a couple of weeks which I'm really excited about too.

    How about you? How's your new job going? Are you getting on ok with the scoring?

    Phil

    PS No, I haven't got around to trying the Tartine recipe yet, but I'm going to pull my finger out and do that this week. I'll send you a picture to prove it..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope this new deck oven has steam injection so you don't have to do it manually anymore! That's great though, I'm sure you'll find new customers! Word of your bread will spread like warm butter on toast.

      Who is teaching this bread course? Is it just an individual or a big flour company? I've thought about taking specific courses for bread/sugar pulling/molded chocolates but they tend to be so expensive... Let me know how it goes!

      New job is okay, certainly not what I initially thought it would be. The bread they do here is just a basic lean dough and I've had to remember how to score on loaves like that. I tried to do a bit of the Philip Agnew style scoring but it ended up making my loaves rise a little wonky... Practice, eh!

      The job is just a seasonal position so I'm back to Vancouver in about 6 weeks. I've already started with the resumes and cover letters so I really hope to have a job before I even get back home.

      Haha, no worries! I never ended up trying the ciabatta recipe (not yet, at least!). I'm living in staff accommodation here at the resort I'm working at which has a very limited kitchen. But I have tons of recipes piled up to try when I get home. If the ciabatta works out, it might be on the blog sometimes in a few months - if that's okay with you!

      Megan

      Delete
  5. Sorry for the late reply Megan.

    Yes, the new oven has steam which I'm really pleased about. Not sure throwing in a cup of water is quite as effective!

    I decided against going on the bread course in the end.. I'm so busy at the moment, plus it was really expense - £795 for 4 days, with up to 10 people in the class. It's at a place called the School of Artisan Food and I've heard really good things about it, so I'll probably bite the bullet and do it at some point.

    Fingers crossed you get a job when you're back - just direct potential employers to your amazing blog and they're going to be v. impressed!

    You'd be very welcome to post the ciabatta recipe if you like it. Oh, I finally tried the Tartine recipe a few days ago, but it didn't quite work out - think I rushed it a bit. I'll keep at it...

    Phil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, that is really expensive. I don't blame you for waiting on that, it's a good chunk of change for just 4 days, especially with the purchase of the new oven.

      I actually have an interview lined up when I get back with an amazing pastry chef who is quite well known in Vancouver! It's just an interview, but it's something at least. Working with him at his patisserie would be my top pick for a job so I really hope it pans out. I won't know until I'm back home, though, which is bit nerve-wracking.

      I think it takes a while to get used to any new bread recipe, don't worry about it. You'll master it in no time, I bet.

      Megan

      Delete
  6. They look so pretty!!! The presentation is fabulous, I also like mousses! Especially the chocolate mousse my grandma makes :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! Dessert made by grandmas are always the best :)

      Delete
  7. hi, so nice to know this recipe. i am going to use this for kitchenaid contest. honey will not be provided as a staple ingredient so is it possible to make tuile without honey. please help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are tons and tons of tuile recipes floating around the internet and most of them don't use honey, actually! Most basic tuile recipes are roughly the same, so just do a quick google search and you'll find one!

      Delete
  8. Hey! I have a question about the tuile. Did you trim the long edges straight before rolling them?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, since I use a stencil, the edges are already nice and neat and there's no need to trim them. I made a stencil out of the lid of a plastic yogurt container - just use an exact knife to cut a rectangle out of the centre and there you go! A perfect tulle stencil.

      Delete
  9. These look delicious!
    I love your idea of using a stencil. How big did you make the tuiles? And how many does the recipe make?
    Can't wait to try these!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The stencil for the tuiles was about 1 inch by 3 inches, but you can make them whatever size (and shape) that you want. Since the tuiles are so thin and require so little batter, the recipe makes about 20 to 30! Way more than you need, but making a smaller size of the recipe is a bit tricky.

      Delete
    2. Having too many is ok. I've never made anything like this and I'm sure I'll break a couple so I'd rather have extra.
      Thanks so much for your reply!
      I'll be making these tomorrow for afternoon tea with my mom and grandmother. I'm sure they'll love them.
      Thanks for sharing!

      Kim

      Delete
  10. this may sound kind of like a strange question but where do you get those types of spoons

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi,

    you said make the tuiles close to the serving but i have to do them early. do you have any suggestion for storing?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How early are you going to make them? Any less than 12 hours, I would suggest an airtight container with a silica packet (those "do not eat" packets you find in shoe boxes and stuff) because the silica is a desiccant, meaning it draws the moisture out of the air and keeps things dry. Any more than 12 hours and I would suggest rebuking them for 30 seconds to a minute right before serving, then shaping them. I've never done that before but I think it should work.

      Delete
  12. Hello!
    I love this recipe andI want to try it, but I'm unsure as to how exactly you do the tuiles. Also, where I live they don't provide gelatine sheets, so thinking in a powder form, how much would you say it is?
    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi! Well, for the tuiles, think of it as a very thin paste. You use a little stencil and spread it onto a silicone baking making. You bake it for just a few minutes and take it out of the oven. The tuile is warm and pliable when it comes out of the oven, so you quickly take it and shape it around something, then leave it to cool. When it cools (just a minute or less!), it will be crunchy and crispy.

      With the gelatin, it's difficult to say because I don't have much experience with powdered gelatin. I wouldn't even know a rough estimate to give you! Sorry about that!

      Delete